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APOOD astronomy picture overlay of the day (syzygy).kml

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	<name>APOOD - astronomy picture-overlay of the day (syzygy)</name>
	<open>1</open>
	<description><![CDATA[<!-- VIGNETTE VERS SITE OFFICIEL-->

<center><a href=" https://productforums.google.com/forum/#!topic/gec-sky/E5Vfln-rP90 "><img src="https://i97.servimg.com/u/f97/11/30/57/61/sans_134.jpg" width="550" height="200" border="0"></a></center>]]></description>
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		<name>The Colorful Clouds of Rho Ophiuchi</name>
		<description><![CDATA[Credit: Adam Block, KPNO Visitor Program, NOAO, AURA, NSF <br><br>
Explanation: The many spectacular colors of the Rho Ophiuchi (oh'-fee-yu-kee) clouds highlight the many processes that occur there. The blue regions shine primarily by reflected light. Blue light from the star Rho Ophiuchi and nearby stars reflects more efficiently off this portion of the nebula than red light. The Earth's daytime sky appears blue for the same reason. The red and yellow regions shine primarily because of emission from the nebula's atomic and molecular gas. Light from nearby blue stars - more energetic than the bright star Antares - knocks electrons away from the gas, which then shines when the electrons recombine with the gas. The dark regions are caused by dust grains - born in young stellar atmospheres - which effectively block light emitted behind them. The Rho Ophiuchi star clouds, well in front of the globular cluster M4 visible above on far lower left, are even more colorful than humans can see - the clouds emits light in every wavelength band from the radio to the gamma-ray.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070903.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>Tentacles of the Tarantula Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[Credit & Copyright: WFI, MPG/ESO 2.2-m Telescope, La Silla, ESO 
<br>
<br>
The largest, most violent star forming region known in the whole Local Group of galaxies lies in our neighboring galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). Were the Tarantula Nebula at the distance of the Orion Nebula -- a local star forming region -- it would take up fully half the sky. Also called 30 Doradus, the red and pink gas indicates a massive emission nebula, although supernova remnants and dark nebula also exist there. The bright knot of stars left of center is called R136 and contains many of the most massive, hottest, and brightest stars known. The image taken with the European Southern Observatory's (ESO's) Wide Field Imager is one of the most detailed ever of this vast star forming region.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070822.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>NGC 253, Sculptor galaxy</name>
		<description>NGC 253 is a large, almost edge-on spiral galaxy, and is one of the nearest galaxies beyond our local neighborhood of galaxies. This dramatic galaxy shows complex structures such as clumpy gas clouds, darkened dust lanes, and young, luminous central star clusters. These elements are typical of spiral galaxies. Caroline Herschel discovered NGC 253 in 1783 while looking for comets. The galaxy&apos;s closeness to Earth makes it an ideal target for amateur astronomers who can see the southern sky and for astronomers interested in learning more about the makeup of these stunning cities of stars.
http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1998/42/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sculptor_Galaxy</description>
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			<name>ngc253</name>
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			<description>http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1998/42/</description>
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		<name>NGC 7331, twin of our Milky Way</name>
		<description>NGC 7331 sits about 50 million light-years from Earth and has been billed as a twin of our own Milky Way galaxy because of its similar mass, star count and spiral arm shapes. Skywatchers Paul Mortfield and Dietmar Kupke recorded this view of NGC 7331 on Oct. 4, 2005 during a nightly observing program run by Kitt Peak.
http://www.space.com</description>
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		<name>orion belt</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Alnitak, Alnilam, Mintaka</b><br>
Credit: Digitized Sky Survey, ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator<br> 
Color Composite: Davide De Martin (Skyfactory)<br><br>

Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka, are the bright bluish stars from east to west (left to right) along the diagonal in this gorgeous cosmic vista. Otherwise known as the Belt of Orion, these three blue supergiant stars are hotter and much more massive than the Sun. They lie about 1,500 light-years away, born of Orion's well-studied interstellar clouds. In fact, clouds of gas and dust adrift in this region have intriguing and some surprisingly familiar shapes, including the dark Horsehead Nebula and Flame Nebula near Alnitak at the lower left. The famous Orion Nebula itself lies off the bottom of this star field that covers an impressive 4.4x3.5 degrees on the sky. The color picture was composited from digitized black and white photographic plates recorded through red and blue astronomical filters, with a computer synthesized green channel. The plates were taken using the Samuel Oschin Telescope, a wide-field survey instrument at Palomar Observatory, between 1987 and 1991.

<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap051013.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>M81, Bode&apos;s Galaxy</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>M81 in Ursa Major </b><br>
Credit & Copyright: Tony Hallas
<br><br>
One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky and similar in size to the Milky Way, big, beautiful spiral M81 lies 11.8 million light-years away in the northern constellation Ursa Major. This remarkably deep image of the region reveals details in the bright yellow core, but at the same time follows fainter features along the galaxy's gorgeous blue spiral arms and sweeping dust lanes. Above M81 lies a dwarf companion galaxy, Holmberg IX, sporting a large, pinkish star-forming region near the top. While M81 and Holmberg IX are seen through a foreground of stars in our own Milky Way galaxy, they are also seen here through a much fainter complex of dust clouds. The relatively unexplored clouds are likely only some hundreds of light-years distant and lie high above our galaxy's plane. Scattered through the image, especially at the the right, the dust clouds reflect the combined light of the Milky Way's stars and have been dubbed integrated flux nebulae.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070427.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>Lagoon Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>The Lagoon Nebula in Gas, Dust, and Stars</b><br>
Credit & Copyright: Antonio Fernandez
<br><br>
Stars are battling gas and dust in the Lagoon Nebula but the photographers are winning. Also known as M8, this photogenic nebula is visible even without binoculars towards the constellation of Sagittarius. The energetic processes of star formation create not only the colors but the chaos. The red-glowing gas results from high-energy starlight striking interstellar hydrogen gas. The dark dust filaments that lace M8 were created in the atmospheres of cool giant stars and in the debris from supernovae explosions. The light from M8 we see today left about 5,000 years ago. Light takes about 50 years to cross this section of M8.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070716.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>NGC 4449</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 4449: Close-Up of a Small Galaxy</b><br>
Credit: NASA, ESA, A. Aloisi (STScI / ESA), Hubble Heritage (STScI / AURA) - ESA/Hubble Collaboration
<br><br>
 Grand spiral galaxies often seem to get all the glory. Their newly formed, bright, blue star clusters along beautiful, symmetric spiral arms are guaranteed to attract attention. But small irregular galaxies form stars too, like NGC 4449, located about 12 million light-years away. In fact, this sharp Hubble Space Telescope close-up of the well-studied galaxy clearly demonstrates that reddish star forming regions and young blue star clusters are widespread. Less than 20,000 light-years across, the small island universe is similar in size, and often compared to our Milky Way's satellite galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. NGC 4449 is a member of a group of galaxies found in the constellation Canes Venatici.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070710.htmll">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>Rosette Nebula (detail)</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Dust Sculptures in the Rosette Nebula</b><br>
Credit & Copyright: Ignacio de la Cueva Torregrosa
<br><br>
What creates the cosmic dust sculptures in the Rosette Nebula? Noted for the common beauty of its overall shape, parts of the Rosette Nebula, also known as NGC 2244, show beauty even when viewed up close. Visible above are globules of dark dust and gas that are slowly being eroded away by the energetic light and winds by nearby massive stars. Left alone long enough, the molecular-cloud globules would likely form stars and planets. The above image was taken in very specific colors of Sulfur (shaded red), Hydrogen (green), and Oxygen (blue). The Rosette Nebula spans about 50 light-years across, lies about 4,500 light-years away, and can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Unicorn (Monoceros).
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070606.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 1672</name>
		<description><![CDATA[Credit & Copyright: Ignacio de la Cueva Torregrosa<br>
Acknowledgment: L. Jenkins (GSFC/U. Leicester)
<br><br>
Many spiral galaxies have bars across their centers. Even our own Milky Way Galaxy is thought to have a modest central bar. Prominently barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, pictured above, was captured in spectacular detail in this recently released image taken by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. Visible are dark filamentary dust lanes, young clusters of bright blue stars, red emission nebulas of glowing hydrogen gas, a long bright bar of stars across the center, and a bright active nucleus that likely houses a supermassive black hole. Light takes about 60 million years to reach us from NGC 1672, which spans about 75,000 light years across. NGC 1672, which appears toward the constellation of the Swordfish (Dorado), is being studied to find out how a spiral bar contributes to star formation in a galaxy's central regions.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070418.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>Flame Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Flame Nebula Close-Up</b><br>
Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler, Jan-Erik Ovaldsen
<br><br>
Of course, the Flame Nebula is not on fire. Also known as NGC 2024, the nebula's suggestive reddish color is due to the glow of hydrogen atoms at the edge of the giant Orion molecular cloud complex some 1,500 light-years away. The hydrogen atoms have been ionized, or stripped of their electrons, and glow as the atoms and electrons recombine. But what ionizes the hydrogen atoms? In this close-up view, a dark lane of absorbing interstellar dust stands out in silhouette against the hydrogen glow and actually hides the true source of the Flame Nebula's energy from optical telescopes. Behind the dark lane lies a cluster of hot, young stars, seen at infrared wavelengths through the obscuring dust. A young, massive star in that cluster is the likely source of energetic ultraviolet radiation that ionizes the hydrogen gas in the Flame Nebula.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070202.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>NGC 602</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 602 and Beyond</b><br>
<i>Credit: NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI / AURA) - ESA/Hubble Collaboration</i>
<br><br>
Near the outskirts of the Small Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy some 200 thousand light-years distant, lies 5 million year young star cluster NGC 602. Surrounded by natal gas and dust, NGC 602 is featured in this stunning Hubble image of the region. Fantastic ridges and swept back shapes strongly suggest that energetic radiation and shock waves from NGC 602's massive young stars have eroded the dusty material and triggered a progression of star formation moving away from the cluster's center. At the estimated distance of the Small Magellanic Cloud, the picture spans about 200 light-years, but a tantalizing assortment of background galaxies are also visible in the sharp Hubble view. The background galaxies are hundreds of millions of light-years or more beyond NGC 602.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070110.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<west>-157.7211545843674</west>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>NGC 6960</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 6960: The Witch's Broom Nebula</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: T. A. Rector (U. Alaska), WIYN, NOAO, AURA, NSF</i>
<br><br>
Ten thousand years ago, before the dawn of recorded human history, a new light must suddenly have appeared in the night sky and faded after a few weeks. Today we know this light was an exploding star and record the colorful expanding cloud as the Veil Nebula. Pictured above is the west end of the Veil Nebula known technically as NGC 6960 but less formally as the Witch's Broom Nebula. The rampaging gas gains its colors by impacting and exciting existing nearby gas. The supernova remnant lies about 1400 light-years away towards the constellation of Cygnus. This Witch's Broom actually spans over three times the angular size of the full Moon. The bright star 52 Cygnus is visible with the unaided eye from a dark location but unrelated to the ancient supernova.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070101.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<latitude>30.73017130038032</latitude>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Open Cluster Pismis 24</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Massive Stars in Open Cluster Pismis 24</b><br>
<i>Credit: NASA, ESA and J. M. Apellániz (IAA, Spain)</i>
<br><br>
How massive can a normal star be? Estimates made from distance, brightness and standard solar models had given one star in the open cluster Pismis 24 over 200 times the mass of our Sun, making it a record holder. This star is the brightest object located just to the right of the gas front in the above image. Close inspection of images taken recently with the Hubble Space Telescope, however, have shown that Pismis 24-1 derives its brilliant luminosity not from a single star but from three at least. Component stars would still remain near 100 solar masses, making them among the more massive stars currently on record. Toward the image left, stars are still forming in the associated emission nebula NGC 6357, including several that appear to be breaking out and illuminating a spectacular cocoon.
<br><br>
<a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061219.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<latitude>-34.18768529195888</latitude>
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		<name>IC 2118</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>IC 2118: The Witch Head Nebula</b><br>
<i>Image Data: Digitized Sky Survey; Color Composite: Noel Carboni</i>
<br><br>
Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn, and cauldron bubble -- maybe Macbeth should have consulted the Witch Head Nebula. This suggestively shaped reflection nebula is associated with the bright star Rigel in the constellation Orion. More formally known as IC 2118, the Witch Head Nebula glows primarily by light reflected from bright star Rigel, located just off the upper right edge of the full image. Fine dust in the nebula reflects the light. The blue color is caused not only by Rigel's blue color but because the dust grains reflect blue light more efficiently than red. The same physical process causes Earth's daytime sky to appear blue, although the scatterers in Earth's atmosphere are molecules of nitrogen and oxygen. The nebula lies about 1000 light-years away.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061211.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>NGC 2174</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 2174: Emission Nebula in Orion</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Dan Kowall (Photonhunter.com)</i>
<br><br>
A lesser known sight in the nebula-rich constellation Orion, NGC 2174 can be found with binoculars near the head of the celestial hunter. About 6,400 light-years distant, the glowing cosmic cloud surrounds loose clusters of young stars. Covering an area larger than the full Moon on the sky, this stunning narrow band image adopts a typical color mapping of the atomic emission from NGC 2174. The false-color mapping shows otherwise red hydrogen emission in green hues and emphasizes sulfur emission in red and oxygen in blue. Placing your cursor on the image will reveal an alternative image of the nebula made through broad band filters. The broad band image combines filters in a closer analogy to human vision, dominated by the red glow of hydrogen. 
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061208.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<latitude>20.54295668092748</latitude>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>NGC 7129 and NGC 7142</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 7129 and NGC 7142</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Tony Hallas</i>
<br><br>
This alluring telescopic image looks toward the constellation Cepheus and an intriguing visual pairing of dusty reflection nebula NGC 7129 (left) and open star cluster NGC 7142. The two appear separated by only half a degree on the sky, but they actually lie at quite different distances. In the foreground, dusty nebula NGC 7129 is about 3,000 light-years distant, while open cluster NGC 7142 is likely over 6,000 light-years away. In fact, the pervasive and clumpy foreground dust clouds in this region redden the light from NGC 7142, complicating astronomical studies of the cluster. Still, NGC 7142 is thought to be an older open star cluster, while the bright stars embedded in NGC 7129 are perhaps a million years young. The telltale reddish crescent shapes around NGC 7129 are associated with energetic jets streaming away from newborn stars. Surprisingly, despite the dust, far off background galaxies can be seen in the colorful cosmic vista. 
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap070913.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>IC 5070</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>A Pelican in the Swan</b><br>
<i>Image Data: Digitized Sky Survey, Color Composite: Charles Shahar</i>
<br><br>
The Pelican Nebula lies about 2,000 light-years away in the high flying constellation Cygnus, the Swan. Also known as IC 5070, this cosmic pelican is appropriately found just off the "east coast" of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000), another surprisingly familiar looking emission nebula in Cygnus. The Pelican and North America nebulae are part of the same large and complex star forming region, almost as nearby as the better-known Orion Nebula. From our vantage point, dark dust clouds (upper left) help define the Pelican's eye and long bill, while a bright front of ionized gas suggests the curved shape of the head and neck. Based on digitized black and white images from the Samuel Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory, this striking synthesized color view includes two bright foreground stars and spans about 30 light-years at the estimated distance of the Pelican Nebula.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061130.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Messier 76</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Little Dumbbell Nebula</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Stefan Seip</i>
<br><br>
"Nebula at the right foot of Andromeda ... " begins the description for the 76th object in Charles Messier's 18th century Catalog of Nebulae and Star Clusters. In fact, M76 is one of the fainter objects on the Messier list and is also known by the popular name of the "Little Dumbbell Nebula". Like its brighter namesake M27 (the Dumbbell Nebula), M76 is recognized as a planetary nebula - a gaseous shroud cast off by a dying sunlike star. The nebula itself is thought to be shaped more like a donut, while its box-like appearance is due to our nearly edge-on view. Gas expanding more rapidly away from the donut hole produces the faint loops of far flung material. The nebula's dying star can be picked out in this sharp color image as the bottom, blue-tinted member of the double star near the center of the box-like shape. Distance estimates place M76 about 3 to 5 thousand light-years away, making the nebula over a light-year in diameter.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061102.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>-154.4193294560216</longitude>
			<latitude>51.57525681720023</latitude>
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			<north>51.63229953733544</north>
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			<west>-154.5552528403505</west>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>IC 4628</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>IC 4628: The Prawn Nebula</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Martin Pugh</i>
<br><br>
South of Antares, in the tail of the nebula-rich constellation Scorpius, lies emission nebula IC 4628. Nearby hot, massive stars, millions of years young, radiate the nebula with invisible ultraviolet light, stripping electrons from atoms. The electrons eventually recombine with the atoms to produce the visible nebular glow. This narrow band image adopts a typical false-color mapping of the atomic emission, showing hydrogen emission in green hues, sulfur as red and oxygen as blue. At an estimated distance of 6,000 light-years, the region shown is about 250 light-years across. The nebula is also cataloged as Gum 56 for Australian astronomer Colin Stanley Gum, but seafood-loving astronomers might know this cosmic cloud as The Prawn Nebula.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061020.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>74.28132353056972</longitude>
			<latitude>-40.44281176580623</latitude>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Reflection Nebulas in Orion</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Reflection Nebulas in Orion</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: T. Rector (U. Alaska Anchorage), H. Schweiker, NOAO, AURA, NSF</i>
<br><br>
 In the vast Orion Molecular Cloud complex, several bright blue nebulas are particularly apparent. Pictured above are two of the most prominent reflection nebulas - dust clouds lit by the reflecting light of bright embedded stars. The more famous nebula is M78, near the image center, cataloged over 200 years ago. On the upper left is the lesser known NGC 2071. The image was taken with the Mayall 4-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA. Astronomers continue to study these reflection nebulas to better understand how interior stars form. The Orion complex lies about 1500 light-years distant, contains the Orion and Horsehead nebulas, and covers much of the constellation of Orion.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061010.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>-93.38633748170892</longitude>
			<latitude>0.1411953856993438</latitude>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Hidden Galaxy IC 342</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Hidden Galaxy IC 342</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Robert Gendler</i>
<br><br>
Similar in size to other large, bright spiral galaxies IC 342 is a mere 7 million light-years distant in the long-necked, northern constellation Camelopardalis. A sprawling island universe, IC 342 would otherwise be a prominent galaxy in our night sky, but it is almost hidden from view behind the veil of stars, gas and dust clouds in the plane of our Milky Way galaxy. Even though IC 342's light is dimmed by intervening cosmic clouds, this remarkably sharp telescopic image traces the galaxy's own obscuring dust, blue star clusters, and glowing pink star forming regions along spiral arms that wind far from the galaxy's core. IC 342 may have undergone a recent burst of star formation activity and is close enough to have gravitationally influenced the evolution of the local group of galaxies and the Milky Way.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061005.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>-123.2927356102594</longitude>
			<latitude>68.09718956675341</latitude>
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			<north>68.2663</north>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Heart Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Light from the Heart Nebula</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Matt Russell</i>
<br><br>
What powers the Heart Nebula? The large emission nebula dubbed IC 1805 looks, in whole, like a human heart. The nebula glows brightly in red light emitted by its most prominent element: hydrogen. The red glow and the larger shape are all created by a small group of stars near the nebula's center. A close up spanning about 30 light years contains many of these stars is shown above . This open cluster of stars contains a few bright stars nearly 50 times the mass of our Sun, many dim stars only a fraction of the mass of our Sun, and an absent microquasar that was expelled millions of years ago. The Heart Nebula is located about 7,500 light years away toward the constellation of Cassiopeia.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap061003.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>-141.5517233390666</longitude>
			<latitude>61.20819905050335</latitude>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>M8, aka the Lagoon Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Blue Lagoon</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Russell Croman</i>
<br><br>
Stars come and go as you slide your cursor over this engaging image of M8, aka the Lagoon Nebula. Of course, the nebula is itself a star-forming region, but the stars that appear and disappear here include background and foreground stars that by chance lie along the same line of sight. In this "for fun" comparison of two nearly identical digital images, the stellar point sources were removed from one image by computer processing to leave only the diffuse emission from the glowing gas clouds. In both pictures, red emission (H-alpha emission) from atomic hydrogen dominates the cosmic lagoon's visible light, but narrow band filters were used to record the image data and map the hydrogen emission to green hues, with emission from sulfur atoms in red and oxygen in blue. The lovely Lagoon Nebula spans about 30 light-years at an estimated distance of 5,000 light-years toward the constellation Sagittarius.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060825.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<longitude>91.07110104284649</longitude>
			<latitude>-24.33813750756125</latitude>
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			<heading>0.04369398870238399</heading>
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			<href>http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0608/lagoon_croman_full.jpg</href>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Reflection Nebula IC 4592</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Horse Head Shaped Reflection Nebula IC 4592</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Jim Misti and Steve Mazlin, (acquisition), Robert Gendler (processing)</i>
<br><br>
Do you see the horse's head? What you are seeing is not the famous Horsehead nebula toward Orion but rather a fainter nebula that only takes on a familiar form with deeper imaging. The main part of the above imaged molecular cloud complex is a reflection nebula cataloged as IC 4592. Reflection nebulas are actually made up of very fine dust that normally appears dark but can look quite blue when reflecting the light of energetic nearby stars. In this case, the source of much of the reflected light is a star at the eye of the horse. That star is part of Nu Scorpii, one of the brighter star systems toward the constellation of Scorpius. A second reflection nebula dubbed IC 4601 is visible surrounding two stars on the far right.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060808.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
		<LookAt>
			<longitude>63.67346456403042</longitude>
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		<name>M81</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Bright Galaxy M81</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Giovanni Benintende</i>
<br><br>
Big and beautiful spiral galaxy M81 lies in the northern constellation Ursa Major. One of the brightest galaxies in planet Earth's sky, M81 is also home to the second brightest supernova seen in modern times. This superbly detailed view reveals M81's bright yellow nucleus, blue spiral arms, and sweeping cosmic dust lanes with a scale comparable to the Milky Way. Hinting at a disorderly past, a remarkable dust lane actually runs straight through the disk, below and right of the galactic center, contrary to M81's other prominent spiral features. The errant dust lane may be the lingering result of a close encounter between M81 and its smaller companion galaxy, M82. Scrutiny of variable stars in M81 (aka NGC 3031) has yielded one of the best determined distances for an external galaxy -- 11.8 million light-years.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060707.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>NGC 6888 overlays</name>
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			<name>NGC 6888</name>
			<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 6888: A Tricolor Starfield</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Don Goldman</i>
<br><br>
 NGC 6888, also known as the Crescent Nebula, is a cosmic bubble about 25 light-years across, blown by winds from its central, bright, massive star. Near the center of this intriguing widefield view of interstellar gas clouds and rich star fields of the constellation Cygnus, NGC 6888 is about 5,000 light-years away. The three color composite image was created by stacking exposures through narrow band filters that transmit the light from atoms in the clouds. Hydrogen is shown as green, sulfur as red, and oxygen as blue. NGC 6888's central star is classified as a Wolf-Rayet star (WR 136) and is shedding its outer envelope in a strong stellar wind, ejecting the equivalent of our Sun's mass every 10,000 years. Burning fuel at a prodigious rate and near the end of its stellar life, this star should ultimately go out with a bang in a spectacular supernova explosion.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060706.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<name>Crescent, NGC6888</name>
			<description><![CDATA[<b>Crescent, NGC6888</b><br>
<i>Credit: T.A. Rector (NRAO/AUI/NSF and NOAO/AURA/NSF)</i>
<br><br>
This wide-field image of the Crescent Nebula was taken at the National Science Foundation's 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak with the NOAO Mosaic CCD camera. Also known as NGC6888, the nebula is a shell of gas that is being energized by the strong stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136, the bright star at the center of the nebula. It is located in the constellation of Cygnus, the Swan. Wolf-Rayet stars are very hot, massive stars that are blowing off their outer layers. In this image north is down and east is to the right. This image was created by combining emission-line images in Hydrogen-alpha (red), Oxygen [O III] (blue) and Sulfur [S II] (yellow).
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://www.noao.edu/image_gallery/html/im0834.html">NOAO</a>]]></description>
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	<GroundOverlay>
		<name>Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>Spiral Galaxy NGC 2403 from Subaru</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Suprime-Cam, Subaru Telescope, NAOJ</i>
<br><br>
Sprawling spiral arms dotted with bright red emission nebulas highlight this new and detailed image of nearby spiral galaxy NGC 2403. Also visible in the photogenic spiral galaxy are blue open clusters, dark dust lanes, and a bright but relatively small central nucleus. NGC 2403 is located just beyond the Local Group of Galaxies, at a relatively close 10 million light years away toward the constellation of the Giraffe (Camelopardalis). NGC 2403 has a designated Hubble type of Sc. In 2004, NGC 2403 was home to one of the brightest supernovas of modern times. The above image, the highest resolution complete image of NGC 2403 ever completed, was taken by the Japan's 8.3-meter Subaru telescope located on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060705.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>The Antennae</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 4038 and NGC 4039</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Daniel Verschatse (Antilhue Observatory)</i>
<br><br>
Some 60 million light-years away in the southerly constellation Corvus, two large galaxies have collided. But stars in the two galaxies - NGC 4038 and NGC 4039 - don't collide in the course of the ponderous, billion year or so long event. Instead, their large clouds of molecular gas and dust do, triggering furious episodes of star formation. Spanning about 500 thousand light-years, this stunning view reveals new star clusters and matter flung far from the scene of the accident by gravitational tidal forces. Of course, the visual appearance of the far-flung arcing structures gives the galaxy pair its popular name - The Antennae. Recorded in this deep image of the region at the tip of the upper arc is a tidal dwarf galaxy NGC 4038S, formed in the cosmic debris.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060630.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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			<latitude>-18.89578036403124</latitude>
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		<name>NGC 6164 A Bipolar Emission Nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<b>NGC 6164: A Bipolar Emission Nebula</b><br>
<i>Credit & Copyright: Gemini Obs., AURA, NSF</i>
<br><br>
How did a star form this beautiful nebula? In the middle of emission nebula NGC 6164-5 is an unusually massive star nearing the end of its life. The star, visible in the center of the above image and catalogued as HD 148937, is so hot that the ultraviolet light it emits heats up gas that surrounds it. That gas was likely thrown off from the star, possibly by its fast rotation, like a rotating lawn sprinkler. Expelled material might have been further channeled by the magnetic field of the star, creating the symmetric shape of the bipolar nebula. Several cometary knots of gas are also visible on the lower left. NGC 6164-5 spans about four light years and is located about 4,000 light years away toward the southern constellation Norma.
<br><br>
more: <a href="http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap060606.html">NASA-APOD page</a>]]></description>
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		<name>NGC 5315 Planetary nebula</name>
		<description><![CDATA[<i>Credit: NASA/ESA/STScI/AURA/The Hubble Heritage Team</i>
<br><br>

   <b>You Might Be Surprised at What You Find Out When Ya Go!   </b>
 <br><br>

Hubble Space Telescope shows an optical image of NGC 5315, a planetary nebula located about 7,000 light years from Earth in the constellation of Circinus.
<br><br>
Planetary nebulas are gaseous clouds created in the last stages of the lifetime of a star like the sun. (Though the term "planetary nebula" is applied to this class of objects, it is a misnomer, like "English horn," as these objects have nothing to do with planets. But the objects looked like planets when viewed through early small optical telescopes.)
<br><br>
NGC 5315 became an X-ray source when powerful winds from a particularly young star at the center collided with the ejected material. This action rendered it visible to the Chandra X-ray telescope, which does not always see planetary nebulas in X-ray light.
<br><br>
Interestingly, astronomers discovered NGC 5315 inadvertently, while searching for the object Hen 2-99 in the same region of space. Although Hen 2-99 was too faint to be detected, the researchers noticed planetary nebula NGC 5315 a large distance away from the aimpoint of the Chandra telescope, where the image is not as sharp.

 

<br><br>
more: <a href="http://www.space.com/imageoftheday/image_of_day_071001.html">space.com: Image of the Day</a>]]></description>
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